Next Generation Firewall Best Practices

Cymbel has been providing consulting services related to next generation firewalls since 2007. Based on our experience, we are often asked about “best practices.” Given the variety of deployment scenarios and different priorities of our clients, we have found it difficult to develop a general set of best practices. However, I recently observed that Palo Alto Networks has been adding best practices information to its Administration Guides.

So I thought it might be useful to pull together Palo Alto Networks’ best practices into a single document, which we have done. If you are interested in receiving this document, please let me know by filling out the form on this page, commenting below, or contacting us at 617-581-6633.

The Real Value of a Positive Control Model

During the last several years I’ve written a lot about the fact that Palo Alto Networks enables you to re-establish a network-based Positive Control Model from the network layer up through the application layer. But I never spent much time on why it’s important.

Today, I will reference a blog post by Jack Whitsitt, Avoiding Strategic Cyber Security Loss and the Unacceptable Offensive Advantage (Post 2/2), to help explain the value of implementing a Positive Control Model.

TL;DR: All information breaches result from human error. The human error rate per unit of information technology is fairly constant. However, because IT is always expanding (more applications and more functions per application), the actual number of human errors resulting in Vulnerabilities (used in the most general sense of the word) per time period is always increasing. Unfortunately, the information security team has limited resources (Defensive Capability) and cannot cope with the users’ ever increasing number of errors. This has created an ever growing “Offensive Advantage (Vulnerabilities – Defensive Capability).”  However, implementing a Positive Control Model to influence/control human behavior will reduce the number of user errors per time interval, which will reduce the Offensive Advantage to a manageable size.

On the network side Palo Alto Networks’ Next Generation Firewall monitors and controls traffic by user and application across all 65,535 TCP and UDP ports, all of the time, at specified speeds. Granular policies based on any combination of application, user, security zone, IP address, port, URL, and/or Threat Protection profiles are created with a single unified interface that enables the infosec team to respond quickly to new business requirements.

On the endpoint side, Trusteer provides a behavioral type of whitelisting that prevents device compromise and confidential data exfiltration. It requires little to no administrative configuration effort. Thousands of agents can be deployed in days. When implemented on already deployed Windows and Mac devices, Trusteer will detect compromised devices that traditional signature-based anti-virus products miss.

Let’s start with Jack’s basic truths about the relationships between technology, people’s behavior, and infosec resources. Cyber security is a problem that occurs over unbounded time. So it’s a rate problem driven by the ever increasing number of human errors per unit of time. While the number of human errors per unit of time per “unit of information technology” is steady, complexity, in the form of new applications and added functions to existing applications, is constantly increasing. Therefore the number of human errors per unit of time is constantly increasing.

Unfortunately, information security resources (technical and administrative controls) are limited. Therefore the organization’s Defense Capability cannot keep up with the increasing number of Vulnerabilities. Since the number of human errors increases at a faster rate than limited resource Defense Capacity, an Unacceptable Offensive Advantage is created. Here is a diagram that shows this.

offensiveadvantage1

What’s even worse, most Defensive controls cannot significantly shrink the gap between the Vulnerability curve and the Defense curve because they do not bend the vulnerability curve, as this graph shows.

offensiveadvantage2

So the only real hope of reducing organizational cyber security risk, i.e. the adversaries’ Offensive Advantage is to bend the Vulnerability curve as this graph shows.

offensiveadvantage3

Once you do that, you can apply additional controls to further shrink the gap between Vulnerability and Defense curves as this graph shows.

offensiveadvantage4

The question is how to do this. Perhaps Security Awareness Training can have some impact.

I recommend implementing network and host-based technical controls that can establish a Positive Control Model. In other words, only by defining what people are allowed to do and denying everything else can you actually bend the Vulnerability curve, i.e. reduce human errors, both unintentional and intentional.

Implementing a Positive Control Model does not happen instantly, i.e. it’s also is a rate problem. But if you don’t have the technical controls in place, no amount of process is going to improve the organization’s security posture.

This is why firewalls are such a critical network technical control. They are placed at critical choke points in the network, between subnets of different trust levels, with the express purpose of implementing a Positive Control Model.

Firewalls first became popular in the mid 1990s. At that time, when a new application was built, it was assigned a port number. For example, the mail protocol, SMTP was assigned port 25, and the HTTP protocol was assigned to port 80. At that time, (1) protocol and application meant the same thing, and (2) all applications “behaved,” i.e. they ran only on their assigned ports. Given this environment, all a firewall had to do was use the port numbers (and IP addresses) to control traffic. Hence the popularity of port-based stateful inspection firewalls.

Unfortunately, starting in the early 2000s, developers began writing applications to bypass the port-based stateful inspection firewall in order to get their applications deployed quickly in organizations without waiting for the security teams to make changes in policies. Also different applications were developed that could share a port like port 80 because it was always open to give people access to the Internet. Other techniques like port-hopping and encryption were used to bypass the port-based, stateful inspection firewall.

Security teams started deploying additional network security controls like URL Filtering to complement firewalls. This increase in complexity created new problems such as (1) policy coordination between URL Filtering and the firewalls, (2) performance issues, and (3) since URL Filtering products were mostly proxy based, they would break some of the newer applications frustrating users trying to do their jobs.

By 2005 it was obvious to some people that the application technology had obsoleted port-based firewalls and their helpers. A completely new approach to firewall architecture was needed that (1)  classified traffic by application first regardless of port, and (2) was backwardly compatible with port-based firewalls to enable the conversion process. This is exactly what the Palo Alto Networks team did, releasing their first “Next Generation” Firewall in 2007.

Palo Alto Networks classifies traffic at the beginning of the policy process by application. It monitors all 65,535 TCP and UDP for all applications, all of the time, at specified speeds. This enables organizations to re-establish the Positive Control Model which bends the “Vulnerability” curve and allows an infosec team with limited resources to reduce, what Jack Whitsitt calls, the adversaries’ “Offensive Advantage.”

On the endpoint side, Trusteer provides a type of Positive Control Model / whitelisting whereby highly targeted applications like browsers, Java, Adobe Flash, PDF, and Microsoft Office applications are automatically protected behaviorally. The Trusteer agent understands the memory state – file I/O relationship to the degree that it knows the difference between good I/O and malicious I/O behavior. Trusteer then blocks the malicious I/O before any damage can be done.

Thus human errors resulting from social engineering such as clicking on links to malicious web pages or opening documents containing malicious code are automatically blocked. This is all done with no policy configuration efforts on the part of the infosec team. The policies are updated by Trusteer periodically. There are no policies to configure. Furthermore, thousands of agents can be deployed in days. Finally, when implemented to deployed Windows and Mac endpoints, it will detect already compromised devices.

Trusteer, founded in 2006, has over 40 million agents deployed across the banking industry to protect online banking users. So their agent technology has been battle tested.

In closing then, only by implementing technical controls which establish a Positive Control Model to reduce human errors, can an organization bend the Vulnerability Curve sufficiently to reduce the adversaries’ Offensive Advantage to an acceptable level.

Surprising Application-Threat Analysis from Palo Alto Networks

This past week, Palo Alto Networks released its H2/2012 Application Usage and Threat Report. Actually, it’s the first time Palo Alto has integrated Application Usage and Threat Analysis. Previous reports were focused only on Application Risk. This report analyzed 12.6 petabytes of data from 3,056 networks, covering 1,395 applications. 5,307 unique threats were identified from 268 million threat logs.

Here are the four most interesting items I noted:

1. Of the 1,395 applications found, 10 were responsible for 97% of all Exploit* logs. One of these was web-browsing. This is to be expected. However, the other nine were internal applications representing 82% of the Exploit* logs!!

This proves once again that perimeter traffic security monitoring is not adequate. Internal network segmentation and threat monitoring are required.

2. Custom or Unknown UDP traffic represented only 2% of all the bandwidth analyzed, yet it accounted for 55% of the Malware* logs!!

This clearly shows the importance of minimizing unidentified application traffic. Therefore the ratio of unidentified to identified traffic is a key security performance indicator and ought to trend down over time.

3. DNS traffic total bytes was only 0.4% of traffic but 25.4% of sessions, and was 3rd for Malware* logs at 13%.

No doubt most, if not all, of this represents malicious Command & Control traffic. If you are not actively monitoring and analyzing DNS traffic, you are missing a key method of detecting compromised devices in your network.

4. 85 of the 356 applications that use SSL never use port 443.

If your firewall is not monitoring all ports for all applications all of the time, you are simply not getting complete visibility and cannot re-establish a Positive Control Model.

*If you are not familiar with Palo Alto Networks’ Threat Protection function, “Exploit” and “Malware” are the two main categories of “Threat” logs. There is a table at the top of page 4 of this AUT report that summarizes the categories and sub-categories of the 268 million Threat Logs captured and analyzed. The “Exploit” logs refer to matches against vulnerability signatures which are typical of Intrusion Prevention Systems. The “Malware” logs are for Anti-Virus and Anti-Spyware signature matches.

What is not covered in this report is Palo Alto’s cloud-based, Wildfire zero-day analysis service which analyzes files not seen before to determine if they benign or malicious. If malicious behavior is found, signatures of the appropriate types are generated in less than one hour and update Threat Protection. In addition, the appropriate IP addresses and URLs are added to their respective blacklists.

This report is well worth reading.

 

 

 

Speaking of Next Gen Firewalls – Forbes

Speaking of Next Gen Firewalls – Forbes. Here is the comment I posted on the Forbes site in response to Richard Stiennon’s post about Next Generation Firewalls.

“As near as I can tell the salient feature of Palo Alto Networks’ products that sets them apart is application awareness. … In my opinion application awareness is just an extension of URL content filtering.”

First, let me start my comment by saying that application awareness, out of context, is almost meaningless. Second, I view technical controls from a risk management perspective, i.e. I judge the value of a proposed technical control by the risks it can mitigate.

Third, the purpose of a firewall is to establish a positive control model, i.e. limit traffic into and out of a defined network to what is allowed and block everything else. The reason everyone is focused on application awareness is that traditional stateful inspection firewalls are port-based and cannot control modern applications that do not adhere to the network layer port model and conventions established when the Internet protocols were first designed in the 1970s.

The reason Palo Alto Networks is so popular is that it extends firewall functionality from the network layer up through the application layer in a single unified policy view. This is unlike most application awareness solutions which, as Richard says, are just extensions of URL filtering, because they are based on proxy technology.

For those more technically inclined, URL Filtering solutions are generally based on proxy technology and therefore only monitor a small set of ports including 80 and 443. However, Palo Alto Networks monitors all 65,535 TCP and UDP ports at specified speeds, all the time from the network layer up through the application layer. If you doubt this, try it yourself. It’s easy. Simply run a standard application on a non-standard port and see what the logs show.

Furthermore, Palo Alto provides a single policy view that includes user, application, zone, URL filtering, and threat prevention columns in addition to the traditional five tuples – source IP, destination IP, source port, destination port, and service.

To the best of my knowledge, Palo Alto Networks is the only firewall, whether called Next Generation Firewall or UTM that has this set of features. Therefore, from a risk management perspective, Palo Alto Networks is the only firewall that can establish a positive enforcement model from the network layer up through the application layer.

A response to Stiennon’s analysis of Palo Alto Networks

I was dismayed to read Richard Stiennon’s article in Forbes, Tearing away the veil of hype from Palo Alto Networks’ IPO. I will say my knowledge of network security and experience with Palo Alto Networks appear to be very different from Stiennon’s.

Full disclosure, my company has been a Palo Alto Networks partner for about four years. I noticed on Stiennon’s LinkedIn biography that he worked for one of PAN’s competitors, Fortinet. I don’t own any of the stocks individually mentioned in Stiennon’s article, although from time to time, I own mutual funds that might. Finally, I am planning on buying PAN stock when they go public.

Let me first summarize my key concerns and then I will go into more detail:

  • Stiennon overstates and IMHO misleads the reader about the functionality of stateful inspection firewall technology. While he seems to place value in it, he fails to mention what security risks they can actually mitigate in today’s environment.
  • He does not seem to understand the difference between UTMs and Next Generation Firewalls (NGFW). UTMs combine multiple functions on an appliance with each function processed independently and sequentially, and each managed with a separate user interface. NGFWs integrate multiple functions which share information, execute in parallel, and are managed with a unified interface. These differences result in dramatically different risk mitigation capabilities.
  • He does not seem to understand Palo Alto Networks unique ability to reduce attack surfaces by enabling a positive control model (default deny) from the network layer up through the application layer.
  • He seems to have missed the fact that Palo Alto Networks NGFWs were designed from the ground up to deliver Next Generation Firewall capabilities while other manufacturers have simply added features to their stateful inspection firewalls
  • He erroneously states that Palo Alto Networks does not have stateful inspection capabilities. It does and is backwards compatible with traditional stateful inspection firewalls to enable conversions.
  • He claims that Palo Alto Networks uses a lot of third party components when in fact there are only two that I am aware of. And he completely ignores several of Palo Alto Networks latest innovations including Wildfire and GlobalProtect.
  • He missed the reason why Palo Alto Networks Jan 2012 quarter revenue was slightly lower than its Oct 2011 quarter which was clearly stated in the S-1.

Here are my detailed comments.

Stateful inspection is a core functionality of firewalls introduced by Check Point Software over 15 years ago. It allows an inline gateway device to quickly determine, based on a set policy, if a particular connection is allowed or denied. Can someone in accounting connect to Facebook? Yes or no.

The bolded sentence is misleading and wrong in the context of stateful inspection. Stateful inspection has nothing to do with concepts like who is in accounting or whether the session is attempting to connect to Facebook. Stateful Inspection is purely a Layer 3/Layer 4 technology and defines security policies based on Source IP, Destination IP, Source Port, Destination Port, and network protocol, i.e. UDP or TCP.

If you wanted to implement a stateful inspection firewall policy that says Joe in accounting cannot connect to Facebook, you would first have to know the IP address of Joe’s device and the IP address of Facebook. Of course this presents huge administrative problems because somebody would have to keep track of this information and the policy would have to be modified if Joe changed locations. Not to mention the huge number of policy rules that would have to be written for all the possible sites Joe is allowed to visit. No organization I have ever known would attempt to control Joe’s access to Facebook using stateful inspection technology.

Since the early 2000s, hundreds and hundreds of applications have been written, including Facebook and its subcomponents, that no longer obey the “rules” that were in place in the mid-90s when stateful inspection was invented. At that time, when a new application was built, it would be assigned a specific port number that only that application would use. For example, email transport agents using SMTP were assigned Port 25. Therefore the stateful inspection firewall policy implementer could safely control access to the email transport service by defining policies using Port 25.

At present, the usage of ports is totally chaotic and abused by malicious actors. Applications share ports. Applications hop from port to port looking for a way to bypass stateful inspection firewalls. Cyber predators use this weakness of stateful inspection for their gain and your loss. Of course the security industry understood this issue and many new types of network security device types were invented and added to the network as Stiennon acknowledges.

But, inspecting 100% of traffic to implement these advanced capabilities is extremely stressful to the appliance, all of them still use stateful inspection to keep track of those connections that have been denied. That way the traffic from those connections does not need to be inspected, it is just dropped, while approved connections can still be filtered by the enhanced capability of these Unified Threat Management (UTM) devices (sometimes called Next  Generation Firewalls (NGFW), a term coined by Palo Alto Networks).

The first bolded phrase is true when a manufacturer adds advanced capabilities like application identification to an existing appliance. Palo Alto Networks understood this and designed an appliance from the ground up specifically to implement these advanced functions under load with low latency.

In the second bolded phrase, Steinnon casually lumps together the terms UTMs and Next Generation Firewalls as if they are synonymous. They are not. While it is true that Palo Alto Networks coined the term Next Generation Firewalls, it only became an industry defined term when Gartner published a research paper in October, 2009 (ID Number G00171540) and applied a rigorous definition.

The key point is that a next generation firewall provides fully integrated Application Awareness and Intrusion Prevention with stateful inspection. Fully integrated means that (1) the application identification occurs in the firewall which enables positive traffic control from the network layer up through the application layer, (2) all intrusion prevention is applied to the resulting allowed traffic, (3) all this is accomplished in a single pass to minimize latency, and (4) there is a unified interface for creating firewall policies. Running multiple inspection processes sequentially, controlled by independently defined policies results in increased latency and excessive use of security management resources, thus not qualifying as a Next Generation Firewall

But PAN really has abandoned stateful inspection, at a tremendous cost to their ability to establish connections fast enough to address the needs of large enterprises and carriers.

This is simply false. Palo Alto Networks supports standard stateful inspection for two purposes. First to ease the conversion process from a traditional stateful inspection firewall. Most of our customers start by converting their existing stateful inspection firewall policy rules and then they add the more advanced NGFW functions.

Second, the use of ports in policies can be very useful when combined with application identification. For example, you can build a policy that says (a) SMTP can run only on port 25 and (b) only SMTP can run on port 25. The first part (a) assures that if SMTP is detected on any of the other 65,534 ports it will be blocked. This means that no cyber predator can set up an email service on any of your non-SMTP servers. The second part (b) says that no other application besides SMTP can run on port 25. Therefore when you open a port for a specific application, you can assure it will be the only application running on that port. Palo Alto Networks can do this because its core functionality monitors all 65,535 ports for all applications all the time.

Steinnon then goes on to quote Bob Walder of NSS Labs and interprets his statement as follows:

In other words, an enterprise deploying PAN’s NGFW is getting full content inspection all the time with no ability to turn it off. That makes the device performance unacceptable as a drop-in replacement for Juniper, Cisco, Check Point, or Fortinet firewalls.

This statement has no basis in facts that I am aware of. Palo Alto Firewalls are used all the time to replace the above mentioned companies’ firewalls. Palo Alto has over 6,500 customers! Does full packet inspection take more resources than simple stateful inspection? Of course. But that misses the point. As I said above, stateful inspection is completely useless at providing an organization a Positive Enforcement Model, which after all is the sine qua non of a firewall. By Positive Enforcement Model, I mean the ability to define what is allowed and block everything else. This is also described as “default deny.”

Furthermore, based on my experience, in a bake-off situaton where the criteria  are a combination of real-world traffic, real-world security policy requirements designed to mitigate defined high risks, and total cost of ownership, Palo Alto Networks will always win. I’ll go a step further and say that in today’s world there is simply no significant risk mitigation value for traditional stateful inspection.

It’s the application awareness feature. This is where PAN’s R&D spending is going. All the other features made possible by their hardware acceleration and content inspection ability are supported by third parties who provide malware signatures and URL databases of malicious websites and categorization of websites by type. 

This is totally wrong. In fact, the URL filtering database and the end point checking host software in GlobalProtect (explained further on) are the only third party components Palo Alto Network uses that I am aware of. PAN built a completely new firewall engine capable of performing stateful inspection (for backward compatibility and for highly granular policies described above), application control, anti-virus, anti-spyware, anti-malware, and URL Filtering in a single pass. PAN writes all of its malware signatures and of course participates in security intelligence sharing arrangements with other companies.

Palo Alto Networks has further innovated with (1) Wildfire which provides the ability to analyze executables being downloaded from the Internet to detect zero-day attacks, and (2) GlobalProtect which enables remote and mobile users to stay under the control and protection of PAN NGFWs.

While anecdotal, the reports I get from enterprise IT professionals are that PAN is being deployed behindexisting (sic) firewalls. If that is the general case PAN is not the Next Generation Firewall, it is a stand alone technology that provides visibility into application usage.  Is that new? Not really. Flow monitoring technology has been available for over a decade from companies like Lancope and Arbor Networks that provides this visibility at a high level. Application fingerprinting was invented by SourceFire and is the basis of their RNA product.

Wow. Let me try to deconstrust this. First, it is true that some companies start by putting Palo Alto Networks behind existing firewalls. Why not? I see this as an advantage for PAN as it gives organizations the ability to leverage PAN’s value without waiting until it’s time to do a firewall refresh. Also PAN can replace a proxy to improve content filtering. I’ll save the proxy discussion for another time. I am surely not privy to PAN’s complete breakdown of installation architectures, but “anecdotally” I would say most organizations are doing straight firewall replacements.

Much more importantly, the idea of doing application identification in an IPS or in a flow product totally misses the point. Palo Alto Networks ships the only firewall that does it to enable positive control (default deny) from the network layer up through the application layer. I am surely not saying that there is no value in adding application awareness to IPSs or flow products. There is. But IPSs use a negative control model, i.e. define what should be blocked and allow everything else. Firewalls are supposed to provide attack surface reduction and cannot unless they are able to exert positive control.

While I will agree that application identification and the ability to enforce policies that control what applications can be used within the enterprise is important I contend that application awareness is ultimately a feature that belongs in a UTM appliance or stand alone device behind the firewall. Like other UTM features it must be disabled for high connection rate environments such as large corporate gateways, data centers, and within carrier networks.

This may be Stiennon’s opintion, but I would ask, what meaningful risks, besides not meeting the requirements of a compliance regime, does a stateful inspection firewall mitigate considering the ease with which attackers can bypass them? I have nothing against compliance requirements per se, but our focus is on information security risk mitigation.

In the three months ending Jan. 31 2012 PAN’s revenue is off from the previous quarter. The fourth quarter is usually the best quarter for technology vendors. There may be some extraordinary situation that accounts for that, but it is not evident in the S-1

There is no denying that year-over-year PAN has been on a tear, almost doubling its revenue from Q4 2010 to Q4 2011. But the glaring fact is that PAN’s revenue growth has completely stalled out in what was a great quarter for the industry.

Perhaps my commenting on these last paragraphs does not belong in this blog post as they are not technical in nature, but IMHO Stiennon is wrong again. Stiennon glosses over the excellent quarter that preceded the last one where PAN grew its revenue from $40.22 million to $57.11 million. Thus the last quarter’s $56.68 million looks to Stiennon like a stall with no explanation. However, here is the exact quote from the S-1 explaining what happened, “For the three month period ended October 31, 2011, the increase in product revenue was driven by strong performance in our federal business, as a result of improved productivity from our expanded U.S. government sales force and increased U.S. government spending at the end of its September 30 fiscal year.” My translation from investment banker/lawyer speak to English is that PAN did so well with the Federal government that quarter that the following quarter suffered by comparison. I could be wrong.

In closing, let me say I fully understand that there is no single silver bullet in security. Our approach is about balancing resources among Prevention, Detection, and Incident Response controls. There is never enough budget to implement every technical control that mitigates some risk. The exercise is to prioritize the selection of controls within budget constraints to provide the maximum information security risk reduction based on an organization’s understanding of its risks. While these priorities vary widely among organizations, I can confidently say that based on my experience, Palo Alto Networks provides the best network-based, Prevention Control, risk mitigation available today. Its, yes, revolutionary technology is well worth investing time to understand.

 

 

 

Anonymous, Decentralized and Uncensored File-Sharing is Booming | TorrentFreak

Anonymous, Decentralized and Uncensored File-Sharing is Booming | TorrentFreak.

Despite efforts to curb file-sharing, it’s booming. New file-sharing apps have been developed that are harder for enterprises to control.

The file-sharing landscape is slowly adjusting in response to the continued push for more anti-piracy tools, the final Pirate Bay verdict, and the raids and arrests in the Megaupload case. Faced with uncertainty and drastic changes at file-sharing sites, many users are searching for secure, private and uncensored file-sharing clients. Despite the image its name suggests, RetroShare is one such future-proof client.

If your Next Generation Firewall uses a Positive Control Model and monitors all 65,535 ports all the time you do not have to worry about these new file-sharing products because they will be blocked as unknown applications. Of course, before you go into production, you must investigate all of the unknown apps to assure that all business-required apps are identified, defined, and allowed by policy.

Botnet communicates via P2P instead of C&C

Symantec reported on a version of Zeus/Spyeye that communicates via P2P among its bot peers rather than “traditional” C&C directly to its control servers. (I put traditional in quotes because I don’t want to give the impression that detecting C&C traffic is easy.)

…it seems that the C&C server has disappeared entirely for this functionality. Where they were previously sending and receiving control messages to and from the C&C, these control messages are now handled by the P2P network.

This means that every peer in the botnet can act as a C&C server, while none of them really are one. Bots are now capable of downloading commands, configuration files, and executables from other bots—every compromised computer is capable of providing data to the other bots. We don’t yet know how the stolen data is communicated back to the attackers, but it’s possible that such data is routed through the peers until it reaches a drop zone controlled by the attackers.

Now if you are successfully blocking all P2P traffic on your network, you don’t have to worry about this new development. However, when P2P is blocked, this version of Zeus/Spyeye reverts to C&C methods. So you still need a technical network security control that can reliably detect compromised end points by monitoring egress traffic to proxies and firewalls and DNS traffic because you surely cannot rely on your host-based security controls. (If you doubt my claim, please contact me and I will prove it to you.)

But what if you have a business requirement for access to one or more P2P networks? Do you have a way to implement a positive control policy that only allows the specific P2P networks you need and blocks all the others? A Next Generation Firewall ought to enable you to meet this business requirement. I say “ought to” because not all of them do. I have written about NGFWs here, here, here, and here.

Black Cat, White Cat | InfoSec aXioms

Ofer Shezaf highlights one of the fundamental ways of categorizing security tools in his post Black Cat, White Cat | InfoSec aXioms.

Black listing, sometimes called negative security or “open by default”, focuses on catching the bad guys by detecting attacks.  Security controls such as Intrusion Prevention Systems and Anti-Virus software use various methods to do so. The most common method to detect attacks matching signatures against network traffic or files. Other methods include rules which detect conditions that cannot be expressed in a pattern and abnormal behavior detection.

 White listing on the other hand allows only known good activity. Other terms associated with the concept are positive security and “closed by default” and policy enforcement. White listing is commonly embedded in systems and the obvious example is the authentication and authorization mechanism found in virtually every information system. Dedicated security controls which use white listing either ensures the build-in policy enforcement is used correctly or provide a second enforcement layer. The former include configuration and vulnerability assessment tools while the latter include firewalls.

Unfortunately, when manufactures apply the term “Next Generation” to firewalls, they may be misleading the marketplace.  As Ofer says, a firewall, by definition, performs white listing, i.e. policy enforcement. One of the key functions of a NGFW is the ability to white list applications. This means the applications that are allowed must be defined in the firewall policy. On the other hand, if you are defining applications that are to be blocked, that’s black listing, and not a firewall.

Also note that Next Generation Firewalls also perform Intrusion Prevention, which is a black listing function. So clearly, NGFWs perform white listing and black listing functions. But to truly earn the right to call a network security appliance a “Next Generation” Firewall, the device must enable application white listing. Adding “application awareness” as a blacklist function is nice, but not a NGFW. For more information, I have written about Next Generation Firewalls and the difference between UTMs and NGFWs.

 

Stiennon’s confusion between UTM and Next Generation Firewall

Richard Stiennon has published a blog post on Netasq, a European UTM vendor called, A brief history of firewalls and the rise of the UTM. I found the post indirectly from Alan Shimmel’s post about it.

Stiennen seems to think that Next Generation Firewalls are just a type of UTM. Shimmel also seems to go along with Stiennon’s view. Stiennon gives credit to IDC for defining the term UTM, but has not acknowledged Gartner’s work in defining Next Generation Firewall.

My purpose here is not to get into a debate about terms like UTM and NGFW. The real question is which network security device provides the best network security “prevention” control. The reality is that marketing people have so abused the terms UTM and NGFW, you cannot depend on the term to mean anything. My remarks here are based on Gartner’s definition of Next Generation Firewall which they published in October 2009.

All the UTMs I am aware of, whether software-based or with hardware assist, use port-based (stateful inspection) firewall technology. They may do a lot of other things like IPS, URL filtering and some DLP, but these UTMs have not really advanced the state (pardon the pun) of “firewall” technology. These UTMs do not enable a positive control model (default-deny) from the network layer up through the application layer. They depend on the negative control model of their IPS and application modules/blades.

Next Generation Firewalls, on the other hand, as defined by Gartner’s 2009 research report, enable positive network traffic control policies from the network layer up through the application layer. Therefore true NGFWs are something totally new and were developed in response to the changes in the way applications are now written. In the early days of TCP/IP, port-based firewalls worked well because each new application ran on its assigned port. For example, SMTP on port 25. In the 90s, you could be sure that traffic that ran on port 25 was SMTP and that SMTP would run only port 25.

About ten years ago applications began using port-hopping, encryption, tunneling, and a variety of other techniques to circumvent port-based firewalls. In fact, we have now reached the point where port-based firewalls are pretty much useless at controlling traffic between networks of different trust levels. UTM vendors responded by adding application identification functionality using their intrusion detection/prevention engines. This is surely better than nothing, but IPS engines use a negative enforcement model, i.e. default allow, and only monitor a limited number of ports. A true NGFW monitors all 65,535 ports for all applications at all times.

In closing, there is no doubt about the value of a network security “prevention” control performing multiple functions. The real question is, does the device you are evaluating fulfill its primary function of reducing the organization’s attack surface by (1) enabling positive control policies from the network layer through the application layer, and (2) doing it across all 65,535 ports all the time?

 

 

 

 

 

Phenergan

Third era of Information Security

As I look over my experience in Information Security since 1999, I see three distinct eras with respect to the motivation driving technical control purchases:

  • Basic (mid-90’s to early 2000’s) – Organizations implemented basic host-based and network-based technical security controls, i.e. anti-virus and firewalls respectively.
  • Compliance (early 2000’s to mid 2000’s) – Compliance regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and PCI drove major improvements in security.
  • Breach Prevention and Incident Detection & Response (BPIDR) (late 2000’s to present) – Organizations realize that regulatory compliance represents a minimum level of security, and is not sufficient to cope with the fast changing methods used by cyber predators. Meeting compliance requirements will not effectively reduce the likelihood of a breach by more skilled and aggressive adversaries or detect their malicious activity.

I have three examples to support the shift from the Compliance era to the Breach Prevention and Incident Detection & Response (BPIDR) era. The first is the increasing popularity of Palo Alto Networks. No compliance regulation I am aware of makes the distinction between a traditional stateful inspection firewall and a Next Generation Firewall as defined by Gartner in their 2009 research report.  Yet in the last four years, 6,000 companies have selected Palo Alto Networks because their NGFWs enable organizations to regain control of traffic at points in their networks where trust levels change or ought to change.

The second example is the evolution of Log Management/SIEM. One can safely say that the driving force for most Log/SIEM purchases in the early to mid 2000s was compliance. The fastest growing vendors of that period had the best compliance reporting capabilities. However, by the late 2000s, many organizations began to realize they needed better detection controls. We began so see a shift in the SIEM market to those solutions which not only provided the necessary compliance reports, but could also function satisfactorily as the primary detection control within limited budget requirements. Hence the ascendancy of Q1 Labs, which actually passed ArcSight in number of installations prior to being acquired by IBM.

The third example is email security. From a compliance perspective, Section 5 of PCI DSS, for example, is very comprehensive regarding anti-virus software. However, it is silent regarding phishing. The popularity of products from Proofpoint and FireEye show that organizations have determined that blocking email-borne viruses is simply not adequate. Phishing and particularly spear-phishing must be addressed.

Rather than simply call the third era “Breach Prevention,” I chose to add “Incident Detection & Response” because preventing all system compromises that could lead to a breach is not possible. You must assume that Prevention controls will have failures. Therefore you must invest in Detection controls as well. Too often, I have seen budget imbalances in favor of Prevention controls.

The goal of a defense-in-depth architecture is to (1) prevent breaches by minimizing attack surfaces, controlling access to assets, and preventing threats and malicious behavior on allowed traffic, and (2) to detect malicious activity missed by prevention controls and detect compromised systems more quickly to minimize the risk of disclosure of confidential data.