California Governor Vetoes Bill Requiring Warrant to Search Mobile Phones | Threat Level | Wired.com

California Governor Vetoes Bill Requiring Warrant to Search Mobile Phones | Threat Level | Wired.com.

California Gov. Jerry Brown is vetoing legislation requiring police to obtain a court warrant to search the mobile phones of suspects at the time of any arrest.

The Sunday veto means that when police arrest anybody in the Golden State, they may search that person’s mobile phone — which in the digital age likely means the contents of persons’ e-mail, call records, text messages, photos, banking activity, cloud-storage services, and even where the phone has traveled.

My question is, what if you password protect your phone? Must you give the police the password? Would that not be akin to incriminating yourself? In other words, could you refuse to give the police the password to your phone on the grounds of 5th Amendment protection?

How Will Technology Disrupt the Enterprise in 2011?

How Will Technology Disrupt the Enterprise in 2011?.

Constellation Group’s Ray Wang lists five core disruptive technologies: social, mobile, cloud, analytics, and unified communications.

What’s interesting to us at Cymbel is that each of them require rethinking compliance and security to mitigate the new risks their deployments create for the enterprise. In other words, inadequately addressing the security and compliance risks around these technologies will inhibit deployment.

What are the risks?

  • Social – The new threat vector – the “inside-out” attack, i.e. rather than having to penetrate the enterprise from the outside-in, all a cybercriminal has to do is lure the insider to an external malware-laden web page.
  • Mobile – All the types of attacks we’ve seen over the years against desktops and laptops are finding their way onto smart phones.
  • Cloud – Will you put trade secrets and PII out in a public cloud deployment without protecting them from third party access? How will you verify that no third parties, like the administrators at SaaS companies are not accessing your data?
  • Analytics – Good security technology has only recently taken hold for traditional relational databases that rely on the SQL access language. The new analytics are about new ways of storing and accessing data for analysis. How do you monitor and control access?
  • Unified Communications – Attempting to apply traditional IPSec VPN technology to converged data, voice, and video networks creates unacceptable latency issues and unstable session connections. And MPLS itself does not provide encryption.

Cymbel’s mission is to provide the information security and compliance solutions which enable these technologies. We help our clients rethink and re-implement defense-in-depth.

Darwin said, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change.”

As an Information Security and Compliance Solution Provider, we are enablers of technology change.

Enterprises Riding A Tiger With Consumer Devices | threatpost

Enterprises Riding A Tiger With Consumer Devices | threatpost.

George Hulme highlights two technology trends which are increasing enterprise security risks – employee-owned smartphones and Web 2.0 applications including social networking.

Today, more than ever, employees are bucking efforts to be forced to work on stale and stodgy corporate notebooks, desktops or clunky, outdated mobile phones. They want to use the same trendy smart phones, tablets, or netbooks that they have at home for both play and work. And that, say security experts, poses a problem.

“If you prohibit access to the services people want to use for their jobs, they end up ignoring you and doing it from their own phone or netbook with their own data connection,” says Josh Corman, research director, security at the analyst firm 451 Group. “Workers are always going to find a way to share data and information more efficiently, and people will always embrace ways to do their job as effectively as possible.”

To control and mitigate the risks of using Web 2.0 applications and social networking, we’ve been recommending to and deploying for our clients Palo Alto Networks’ Next Generation Firewalls.

Palo Alto posted a well written response to Hulme’s article, Which is Riskier: Consumer Devices or the Applications in Use? Clearly, Palo Alto’s focus is on (1) controlling application usage, (2) providing intrusion detection/prevention for allowed applications, and (3) blocking the methods people have been using (remote access tools, external proxies, circumventors) to get around traditional network security solutions.

We have been big supporters of the thinking that the focus of information security must shift from protecting devices to protecting information. That is the core of the next generation defense-in-depth architecture we’ve assembled.

Corman agrees that the focus needs to shift from protecting devices to protecting data. “Security managers need to focus on the things they can control. And if they can control the computation platforms, and the entry and exit points of the network, they can control the access to sensitive data, regardless of who is trying to access it,” he says. Corman advises enterprises to deploy, or increase their focus on, technologies that help to control data access: file and folder encryption, enterprise digital rights management, role-based access control, and network segmentation.

Having said that, we are currently investigating a variety of new solutions directly aimed at bringing smartphones under enterprise control, at least for the enterprise applications and data portion of smartphone usage.

Is there a need for mobile anti-malware

With the increasing popularity of mobile devices like iPhones and Android-based phones, we are beginning to see targeted malware, raising the question, do we need anti-malware for our mobile devices? ReadWriteWeb Enterprise was prompted to write an article on this topic as a result of the Android game Tap Snake which was reported to be spyware.

It appears the mobile anti-malware market is fairly immature:

I took to the opportunity to test a few of the anti-malware apps available on the market: antivirus free from droidSecurity, Lookout, Symantec‘s Norton Mobile Security for Android beta, and Smobile. I was also going to try SmrtGuard, but I couldn’t get the app to activate before Tap Snake was removed from Android Market. Of those four apps, only one detected Tap Snake as a potential threat.

The article goes on to say that tightly controlling what apps can be loaded onto mobile devices may all enterprises need at this time.

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Time for security protection on smartphones?

Critical vulnerabilities appearing in both iPhones and Android phones point to the need for third party security products.

Apparently Juniper and McAfee think so. Juniper recently announced that it was acquiring SMobile Systems for $70 million. McAfee acquired TenCube. Another product in this space is Lookout.

Finally, which operating system do you think is more secure? Do you prefer closed vs. open source? Here is a recent article from Network World discussing this issue.